Sunday, May 24, 2020

The Theory Of Perception And Knowing - 1760 Words

To James and Lippmann, the stimuli world is a buzzing confusion that bombards the perceiver. From Shakespeare and Socrates to Kant and Kohler, the power of perception has been discussed by philosophers and psychologists alike. Construction of perception and knowing is subjective, depending on factors such as motives, wants, needs, values, cultures, norms, and mood. Meaning is constructed to end doubt, prepare for action, and obtain sub-jective feelings of control. In the social world, inferences and categorization happen at an unconscious level. However, we have the cognitive flexibility to engage in effor Separating meaning from pure sensation was the goal for Kohler and Bruner. For Kohler, even the most elementary forms of knowing†¦show more content†¦When a person is forced to choose between stimuli, a per-son will respond to stimuli based on which stimuli speak to his or her goals most clearly. Similar to Kohler and Bruner, Lewin believed motives and goals could operate at an uncon-scious level, yet play an essential part in perception and action. Goals and motives that were chosen consciously and operate unconsciously are known as â€Å"quasi-needs.† Ability of a stimulus to capture one’s attention depends on the strength of the quasi-need. Stimuli related to our goals stand out to us while stimuli unrelated to our goals may go unnoticed. This con-firmation bias can be exemplified by the willingness of people to believe fake news when it fits their unconscious goals. These goals operate passively, waiting to be triggered by an en-vioronmental cue. Building o n Lewin’s work, Postman, Bruner, and McGinnies found that the perceptual meaning of value-laden words were dependent upon the perceiver’s likes and dislikes. Culture and norms took the center stage in Sherif’s assertion that there were two ways of framing the construction of knowledge. First, a stimulus may not invoke the same effect in person at different times; instead, the perceptual experience and subsequent behav-ior may be a function of the state of the organism at the time. By the same token, researchers have found that negative mood states reduce one’s perceptual focus, making it more diffi-cult toShow MoreRelatedDavid Hume s Theory Of Cognitive Structure1415 Words   |  6 Pagesexactly constitutes knowing and the conditions which make knowing possible. One of these philosophers is David Hume who is his book An Inquiry Concerning Human Understanding, claims that reasoning cannot demonstrate that things in the world exist therefore, all we can really know are our sense perceptions. An obvious flaw that is seen with Hume’s philosophy is that he reduces all knowledge to sense perceptions gained from experience. As Hume’s theory is limited to sense perception, another philosopherRead MoreTo what extent do ways of knowing prevent us from deluding ourselves? Justify your answer with reference to at least one area of knowledge1618 Words   |  7 Pageswhat extent do ways of knowing prevent us from deluding ourselves? Justify your answer with reference to at least one area of knowledge Ways of knowing are the core of TOK for us to get knowledge in different Areas of Knowledge. The two key terms on this essay question are â€Å"ways of Knowing† and â€Å"deluding ourselves†. â€Å"Ways of knowing are how we acquire knowledge about the world around us, and figure out our relationship with it†. (IB Diploma Program, 31) Ways of Knowing help us to understand AreasRead MoreAll of the Other Ways of Knowing Are Controlled by Language. ¡Ã‚ ¨ What Does This Statement Mean and Do You Think It Is a Fair Representation of the Relationship Between Perception, Emotion, Reason and Language?1463 Words   |  6 Pagesuse it. In the statement  ¡Ã‚ §All of the other ways of knowing are controlled by language ¡Ã‚ ¨, language is defined as  ¡Ã‚ §words ¡Ã‚ ¨ and this  ¡Ã‚ §control ¡Ã‚ ¨ can be defined as  ¡Ã‚ §dominate ¡Ã‚ ¨. Then this saying seems not so fair to represent the relationship between the four ways of knowing. It is more sensible to sa y language gives some support or limit to our reason ¡Aperception and emotion. It may influence them, but not only one way  ¡V the four ways of knowing interact with each other. The function of languageRead MoreThe Knowledge Of Natural Sciences And History1592 Words   |  7 Pageslink, for example, of perception in math or how reason could fit into art. A network suggests that more than one way of knowing can collaborate within another in order to gain knowledge in a particular Area of knowing. The statement implies that not using a network of WOK to gain knowledge is unwise. Thus, I wish to examine how we best acquire knowledge in Natural Sciences and History. My two central knowledge questions are, how reliable is it to use only one way of knowing in one Area of knowledgeRead MoreThat Which Is Accepted as Knowledge Today Is Sometimes Discarded Tomorrow†. Consider Knowledge Issues Raised by This Statement in Two Areas of Knowledge.1304 Words   |  6 Pagesuniverse was static. Until Einstein presented his theory and explained how the solar system worked. This example raises a knowledge issue: â€Å"Can we say that the knowledge attained through reasoning and perception is immutable†? Because the aforementioned example completely refuted this idea. What is knowledge? Knowledge is a combination of random information. This is systematically arranged through different ways of knowing specially reasoning and perception. Knowledge is classified as a factual beliefRead MoreWhy Is Knowledge Important Than Knowledge? Essay1388 Words   |  6 Pagesnetwork of ways of knowing.† Discuss this Statement with reference to two areas of knowledge. â€Å"I believe in intuition and inspiration. Imagination is more important than knowledge. Forknowledge is limited, whereas imagination embraces the entire world, stimulating progress, giving birth to evolution. It is, strictly speaking, a real factor in scientific research.† - Albert Einstein The above lines were quoted by Albert Einstein which states the importance of ways of knowing in gaining knowledgeRead MoreThe Work of James Jerome Gibson1073 Words   |  5 PagesI. Brief biography1 James Jerome Gibson was born on January 27, 1904, in McConnelsville, Ohio, U.S. and died on December 11, 1979. He was an experimental psychologist whose work focused primarily on visual perception. He received his Ph.D. in Psychology from Princeton University in 1928 and joined the faculty of Smith College. During World War II he served in the Army Air Forces (1942–46). In the Army, Gibson developed tests used to screen potential pilots. In doing so, he made the observation thatRead MoreCan one be certain if a divine force, like God, or the Big Bang created our world, focusing on the600 Words   |  3 PagesGod, or the Big Bang created our world, focusing on the Earth and our solar system? There are facts supporting both of these theories. However, since our ways of knowing are altered by both our perceptions and reason, this is why everyone has their own opinion. Since facts are changed and disproved daily, we need to be able to learn and understand with these ways of knowi ng. In the natural sciences and history, facts and being founded and disproved daily, and we have to ask ourselves a question. CanRead MoreEssay Limitations to Our Common Ways of Knowledge1219 Words   |  5 Pagesconventional ways of knowing: emotion, perception, reason, and language. From traditional definitions, we know tools are things used to shape, form, or finish. The above quote by Abraham Maslow can be applied to the pursuit of knowledge. In the TOK context, we can make interesting discussion about the limitations of our ways of knowledge, and the advantages and disadvantages we might face by using a select combination of them. As discussed above, over-reliance on a single way of knowing can almost neverRead MoreThe Fundamental Knowledge Of Knowledge1637 Words   |  7 PagesCan we progress through applying knowledge generated decades ago? To determine whether knowledge generated from areas such as history and science can predict the future, it is necessary to know whether the knowledge acquired through these areas of knowing is consistent, irrespective of changes in time and culture, amongst other factors. Through considering this question, we are gaining insight into whether we should uphold our current knowledge beliefs or aim for perpetual progression and uncover new

Thursday, May 14, 2020

Plato vs. Aristotle - 2421 Words

By Gerard Chretien Plato vs. Aristotle Numerous experts in modern time regard Plato as the first genuine political philosopher and Aristotle as the first political scientist. They were both great thinkers in regards to, in part with Socrates, being the foundation of the great western philosophers. Plato and Aristotle each had ideas in how to proceed with improving the society in which they were part of during their existence. It is necessary therefore to analyze their different theoretical approaches regarding their philosophical perspectives, such as ethics and psychology. This paper however will mainly concentrate on Aristotles views on friendship and how it impacts todays society. The main objective in Platos†¦show more content†¦In retrospect, Aristotle felt by using real world experience along with real people, he can see first hand how and what way can he improve society. Plato and Aristotle both agreed on justice and viewed it objectively; that is it controls the belief a life of good nature would be provided for all people no matter their ranking in society. Aristotles states In democracies, for example, justice is considered to mean equality, no oligarchies, again inequality in the distribution of office to considered just. Plato views the idea of law and justice as what sets the standard for societys behavior in a state. Aristotle puts emphasis on the institution of the polis or civilized community. The polis was structured to allow the average individual in society to participate in political matters. This institutional forum is not the city-state or the community, but merely the larger of the two entities. It is rather a partnership between households, clans, and villages for the sake of a fully developed and self-sufficient life. The polis enables those individuals who naturally posses moral intellect and wisdom an opportunity to rise to higher positions (Class Notes). Justice is the political good within the polis, and it must promote the common interest of the people of the state. What is seen as good must be distributed and regulated through out the state. The law is also the regulating factor that arises from equal and free people in civilShow MoreRelatedPlato vs. Aristotle1952 Words   |  8 PagesPlato vs. Aristotle Plato and Aristotle, two philosophers in the 4th century, hold polar views on politics and philosophy in general. This fact is very cleverly illustrated by Raphaels School of Athens (1510-11; Stanza della Segnatura, Vatican), where Plato is portrayed looking up to the higher forms; and Aristotle is pointing down because he supports the natural sciences. In a discussion of politics, the stand point of each philosopher becomes an essential factor. It is not coincidentalRead MorePlato Vs Aristotle Vs Plato1814 Words   |  8 PagesPlato and Aristotle had a considerable amount of differences in ideology given that Aristotle was Plato’s student for roughly two decades. Plato, a student of Socrates, opposed the idea of average citizens to participate in politics because he believed that political practice was skill or â€Å"technÄ“ that can only be achieved by a few people. He believed that â€Å"kings must be those among them who have proved best both in philosophy and where war is concerned.† (Republic, 491) and that these â€Å"philosopherRead More Aristotle vs. Plato Essay1408 Words   |  6 PagesAristotle vs. Plato Excellence is a function which renders excellent the thing of which it is a function is Plato’s definition of virtue. What does this definition really mean though? Plato and Aristotle both had their own unique arguments devoted to the topic at hand, and their own ways of describing what virtue really is. Defining virtue may seem to be an easy taste, but to truly understand the arguments behind the definition can prove to be very challenging.   Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Before discussing virtueRead MorePlato Vs Aristotle : Determining Good1668 Words   |  7 Pages Plato vs. Aristotle: Determining Good In this paper, I will present both Plato and Aristotle’s arguments for what their personal views are on determining good. Plato believed that knowing good was equal to doing good. He said that if a person knows the right thing that will automatically lead him to do the right thing. Aristotle on the other hand believed that knowing good was not enough to be good. He believed that one had to practice good if one is to be good. Plato was idealistic. He believedRead MorePlato vs. Aristotle: Virtue1656 Words   |  7 Pages201 November 12, 2013 Anna Umstead Plato and Aristotle, arguably two of the most influential Greek philosophers, discussed their differing views on virtue extensively throughout many of their works. Although they agree that virtue is a desirable characteristic that will lead to happiness, the ultimate good, there exists between the two philosophies salient differences. While Plato believes only philosophers are capable of true, inherent virtue, Aristotle believes all men can be virtuous with practiceRead More Plato vs Aristotle Essay1835 Words   |  8 PagesFirst there was Plato and then Aristotle. Aristotle was a pupil of Plato. Despite being taught by Plato they had different theories and views. Their ethics were very typical and traditional of ancient Greece but Aristotle detailed virtue ethics and the path to happiness. Plato’s political theories for a utopian society varied from Aristotle’s view of ‘best state for each society’. Their metaphysical theories are complete opposites and v ery contradicting. Even though Plato and Aristotle came from theRead MoreViolence in the Arts Ââ€" Plato vs. Aristotle Essay1285 Words   |  6 PagesViolence in The Arts Ââ€" Plato vs. Aristotle Nowadays, it is hard to turn on a television program, catch a movie or buy your younger sibling a video game without encountering a warning for extreme violence. Everyday, our lives are exposed to violence on the screen, whether it is in the latest Sopranos episode or even watching the six oclock news. For quite a while now, people have been demanding that stricter censorship be placed on the media, especially those programs and video games that canRead MoreEssay about Aristotle vs Plato1665 Words   |  7 Pages Aristotle is considered by many to be one of the most influential philosophers in history. As a student of Plato, he built on his mentor’s metaphysical teachings of things like The Theory of Forms and his views on the soul. However, he also challenged them, introducing his own metaphysical ideas such as act and potency, hylemorphism, and the four causes. He used these ideas to explain his account of the soul and the immateriality of intellect. Prior to Aristotle, philosophers likeRead MoreJustice: Plato vs. Aristotle Essay1024 Words   |  5 PagesPlato and Aristotle, arguably the most important philosophers of their time, both made attempts to define justice. Being that Aristotle was a student of Plato, their ideas share many similarities. Both viewed justice as the harmonious interaction of people in a society. However, Plato defined his ideal of justice with more usage of metaphysics, invoking his Form of the Good, while Aristotle took a more practical approach, speaking in terms of money and balance. Although Aristotles ideal of justiceRead More Plato Vs. Aristotle on Art Essay1997 Words   |  8 Pagesthe next generation. Plato, a Greek philosopher who lived during 420-348 B.C. in Athens, and Aristotle, Plato’s student who argued against his beliefs, have no exceptions to the steps they had to take in order to understand the purpose of art and artists. Though these two philosophers made marvelous discoveries about the existence of art, artists, and aesthetic experience, Plato has made his works more controversial than Aristotle. During the ancient times in Greece, Plato was the first human to

Wednesday, May 6, 2020

Nature/Nurture Debate on Gender with Reference to David...

David Reimer was born on 22nd August 1967 as a male identical twin. His birth name was Bruce and his twin brother was named Brian. At the age of 8 months while undergoing a circumcision operation, Bruce’s penis was burned beyond surgical repair. Ten months after the operation, Bruce’s parents became associated with Dr. John Money, a world renowned sex researcher developing a reputation in the field of gender identity. Dr. Money argued it was possible for a person to change gender successfully through surgery, socialisation and hormone replacement. Unaware Dr. Money had never attempted this before, Bruce’s parents, Ron and Janet Reimer consented. On 3rd July 1967 Bruce was surgically castrated and renamed Brenda. Brenda’s parents†¦show more content†¦When it was born it behaved in the same assertive ways that male monkeys behaved. It challenged other males to fights, joined in rough and tumble games and tried to mate with female monkeys. Other studies of animals being injected with opposite sex hormones produced similar results. It is important not to generalise animal study findings to human beings who are very much aware of their behaviour and are able to control it. Imperato-McGinley et al (1974) studied members of the Batista family who, due to a mutant gene, were born with the external features of a young girl, but physically changed into men at puberty. The large increase in testosterone at puberty activated a process that should have occurred during prenatal development and so they developed male gentile and became men also showing masculine behaviour and going on to marry women. The easy adjustment of the Batista children led scientists to challenge the usual view that male or female behaviour is determined more by the way we are brought up than by our physiology. They suggest that there may be part of the brain which is different in males and females which governs much of what we think of as sex-role behaviour. However, critics of the Biological approach would argue the Batista’s may have been able to adopt masculine behaviour more readily because of their supportive environment, rather than biological changes. If biological factors explained genderShow MoreRelatedD1- Analyse the Significance of Genetic Influences as Opposed to Social Factors in Human Development1669 Words   |  7 PagesIn D1 I will be assessing the genetic and social factors on a person’s development; I will be using the David Reimer and few case studies of my own about twins. I will then come to my own conclusion of which one I think is the most important in each story nature or nurture. First of all David Reimer (then known as Bruce) was genetically born a boy however in 1966 his penis was destroyed by accident during a circumcision, his parents then took him to a psychologist and sexologists John Money.Read MoreThe Nature of Development Essay2289 Words   |  10 Pagesway their chin points, nurture and nature affect every aspect of human life. There is a debate brewing in the psychological, sociological and scientific communities over which of these two have the higher influence. While most of the members of these communities acknowledge the fact that both nature and nurture affect development, some believe that only one solely determines certain aspects of life, such as gender. Dr. John Money is one of these people; he believes that gender identity is solely aRead MoreAnalysis Of David Reimer s From Undoing Gender 1742 Words   |  7 PagesWhile Judith Butler’s claim in her essay â€Å"From Undoing Gender† is challenging, complex, and comprehensi ble, she provides somewhat enough evidence, and analysis of David Reimer’s case to prove her claim that society uses language to set the norms of what a gender should be and how one should act in accordance with one’s gender. First, Butler’s use of David Reimer’s case, known as â€Å"the John/Joan case† (Interview: John Colapinto†), â€Å"a boy who accidentally had his penis burned and subsequently amputated

Tuesday, May 5, 2020

Ebola Virus Essay In English Example For Students

Ebola Virus Essay In English The Ebola VirusCause of DisorderEbola is a virus and part of the negative-stranded RNA family known as filovirus. It was discovered in 1976 in Africa and was named after a river in Zaire. When the virus is looked at under an electron microscope the filoviridae appear as being long, thin and occasionally they have branches sprouting from one place or another. Ebola can also take the form of a U or a b. There are four known strains of the virus; they are Ebola Sudan, Ebola Zaire, Ebola Reston and Ebola Tai. Ebola Reston only causes disease in monkeys but as the rest of them take approximately 8 hours to duplicate itself. How is it TransmittedThe Ebola virus can easily be transmitted through direct contact of blood, organs, secretions of any kind and semen from any person infected. Another method is that of used needles that have been infected. With all countries considered, the 3rd world and the reuse of needles are a common practice, due to lack of funds and supplies. Though recovered patients pose no serious threat, the virus is present up to 7 weeks after being treated. Vomit and diarrhea contain the infected blood and mucus so any contact with this, e.g. in poor drinking water can cause contraction of the virus. Luckily enough Ebola is not airborne and in some cases due to its self-limiting nature, it has been known to die out within a person before killing the host. In one case when a Swiss researcher found the Ebola Tai virus, she contracted it from a chimpanzee. This was during an investigation into the spur of deaths among them at the time. To this day, there is still no evidence as to what h ost carried the virus before humans and no location of the virus is known. The Effect on the BodyWithin the 4 to 16 days the Ebola virus starts to show its face with headaches, fevers, chills, muscle aches and a loss of appetite. As the virus progresses, patients start to experience diarrhea, rashes, a sore throat, vomiting, abdominal pain, and chest pain. The ability and functions of the liver and kidneys become limited, and internal and external bleeding starts. The blood no longer clots and that obviously causes serious problems. Capillaries start to bleed which leads to the loss of intravascular volume, and then soon death, all within 17 days of infection. Fatal cases (70%-90%) are due to shock, internal bleeding, and an acute respiratory disorder; those at the serious stage of the attack are often delirious, combative and difficult to control. To put it frankly, after about a week and a bit the internal organs have turned to mush and theres no hope. PreventionThere is no vaccine for the Ebola virus so the only way to prevent an outbreak is education of what this virus is truly capable of doing and how victims can be properly treated. The key to saving a population from massacre is prompt isolation before the virus has a chance to hop hosts. An essential element to finding a method of safety is to track the virus to what may have carried it before humans but there is no evidence of this. There was a massive inquiry in to the host after the outbreaks of 1976 and 1979 but again no evidence. Doctors confronted with the disease are to follow the Barrier Technique; this includes the following actions:1) Doctors and nurses wear gowns, masks, gloves, and goggles when caring for patients,2) The patients visitors are cut off,3) Disposable materials are burned after use,4) All reusable materials are sterilized before use,5) The virus is easily killed by disinfectants, so all hard surfaces are cleaned with a sanitizing solution. .ua426152d08a63d08b8ed57e3db087d66 , .ua426152d08a63d08b8ed57e3db087d66 .postImageUrl , .ua426152d08a63d08b8ed57e3db087d66 .centered-text-area { min-height: 80px; position: relative; } .ua426152d08a63d08b8ed57e3db087d66 , .ua426152d08a63d08b8ed57e3db087d66:hover , .ua426152d08a63d08b8ed57e3db087d66:visited , .ua426152d08a63d08b8ed57e3db087d66:active { border:0!important; } .ua426152d08a63d08b8ed57e3db087d66 .clearfix:after { content: ""; display: table; clear: both; } .ua426152d08a63d08b8ed57e3db087d66 { display: block; transition: background-color 250ms; webkit-transition: background-color 250ms; width: 100%; opacity: 1; transition: opacity 250ms; webkit-transition: opacity 250ms; background-color: #95A5A6; } .ua426152d08a63d08b8ed57e3db087d66:active , .ua426152d08a63d08b8ed57e3db087d66:hover { opacity: 1; transition: opacity 250ms; webkit-transition: opacity 250ms; background-color: #2C3E50; } .ua426152d08a63d08b8ed57e3db087d66 .centered-text-area { width: 100%; position: relative ; } .ua426152d08a63d08b8ed57e3db087d66 .ctaText { border-bottom: 0 solid #fff; color: #2980B9; font-size: 16px; font-weight: bold; margin: 0; padding: 0; text-decoration: underline; } .ua426152d08a63d08b8ed57e3db087d66 .postTitle { color: #FFFFFF; font-size: 16px; font-weight: 600; margin: 0; padding: 0; width: 100%; } .ua426152d08a63d08b8ed57e3db087d66 .ctaButton { background-color: #7F8C8D!important; color: #2980B9; border: none; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: none; font-size: 14px; font-weight: bold; line-height: 26px; moz-border-radius: 3px; text-align: center; text-decoration: none; text-shadow: none; width: 80px; min-height: 80px; background: url(https://artscolumbia.org/wp-content/plugins/intelly-related-posts/assets/images/simple-arrow.png)no-repeat; position: absolute; right: 0; top: 0; } .ua426152d08a63d08b8ed57e3db087d66:hover .ctaButton { background-color: #34495E!important; } .ua426152d08a63d08b8ed57e3db087d66 .centered-text { display: table; height: 80px; padding-left : 18px; top: 0; } .ua426152d08a63d08b8ed57e3db087d66 .ua426152d08a63d08b8ed57e3db087d66-content { display: table-cell; margin: 0; padding: 0; padding-right: 108px; position: relative; vertical-align: middle; width: 100%; } .ua426152d08a63d08b8ed57e3db087d66:after { content: ""; display: block; clear: both; } READ: Healthy Eating EssayTreatmentThe Ebola virus can be diagnosed by the detection of Ebola antigens, antibodies, or genetic material. It can also be found with the help of a culture from any of the three sources. With such a high mortality rate of 70% to 90%, it is obvious that there is no cure for such a powerful virus. In comparison to AIDS (level 2) the Ebola virus is at a level 4 pathogen, only the deadliest known to man get this classification, yet the range of severity could be relatively mild or fatal. That leaves a lot open to fate and your immune system. Works Sitedhttp://www.cdc.gov/ncidod/EID/vol2no2/olsen.htmhttp://www.ebola.gb.nethttp://www.search/ualr.edu/~mgolson/ebola.htmlhttp://www.cdc.gov/ncidod/disease/urtfvr/ebolainf.htm

Monday, April 6, 2020

Irony In OConnor Essays - Good Country People, Rhetorical Techniques

Irony in O'Connor Flannery O'Connor uses irony in "Good Country People" to give the reader a better sense of what she is trying to communicate to the reader, and show the meaning of her characters and their actions. There are several ironies in the story that the reader can see in there first reading, but there are several that need more attention. The first is Hulga's mother and people around them. The second example is the Bible salesman, and the way he fools everyone but Mrs. Hopewell. The last is the main character Hulga whose personality is an irony in itself. All three of these give different examples of irony, that leaves the reader wondering about O'Connor's cleverness in thinking. The first ironies involves Hulgas mother and the people she talks about. Mrs. Hopewell says that Mrs. Freeman is a person who never admits she was wrong and that she is into everyone's business. She then says Mrs. Freeman is a lady. Another example is when she describes Mrs. Freeman's daughters Glynese and Carramae, "as the finest girls she ever knew"(393) immediately after the reader learns that Carramae is only fifteen and already pregnant and married, and Glynese was eighteen but already had many admirers. The second source of irony is in the Bible salesman and the fact that he turns out to not be such a good country person. He appears to be a simple boy spreading the word of God through the world with the little time he has, due to the ailment suspiciously similar to the what Hulga is supposedly dying of. His whole character is an irony. He says he is a Bible salesman but, in fact, is not even a Christian. The bible he carries around, has two sides like its owner. On its outside, it seems to be a good old bible, but when it is opened the reader finds alcohol, playing cards, and other objects that show the salesman's true character. Another irony is the way the salesman fools Hulga into thinking he is not very bright and then he turns around and tricks her into giving him her false leg. The last example is the main character Hulga. The first irony in Hulga is the fact that she has an exceptional education, but she is still fooled by the simple Bible salesman. She also has an irony similar to the Bible-Salesman. Hulga is a tough, educated, invulnerable woman with her leg on, but as soon as she takes it off, she reverts to Joy who is still a vulnerable little girl. Another irony is that she is mean to all who are nice to her and she is nice to the one person who is cruel to her, and shows her no compassion. All of these examples of irony show O'Connor's cleverness. They also show the different aspects, which makes the reader think and contemplate deeper into the meaning of O'Connor's words. "Good Country People" is just one example of how irony is used by one author, after someone reads a story like this, one should be more aware of ironies in Literature

Sunday, March 8, 2020

Free Essays on Theseus

Hero Quest Analysis of Theseus The ancient Greek myth, Theseus is a great example of a hero quest. It includes all thirteen elements of a hero quest clearly. It also includes certain motifs that are prime in a hero quest. This great hero quest is a story of a young boy, who is weak and poor. He finds out of his great history and attempts to find his destiny. The first element that all hero quests have is that the hero usually has a strange origin and this story is no different. As a young boy, Theseus is somewhat weak, and scared to fight. He gets beat up by the village boys a lot. One day, his mother tells him that he is really the son of a king. Confused, Thesus asks why they do not live in Athens with the king. She tells him that the king has family that wishes to divide the kingdom up among the fifty sons, and that they would have killed Theseus immediately when learning of his origin. But that is not the end of Theseus’s strange origin. One day while laying by the sea, wishing the sea would kill him, a gull visits him and tells him his true origin. He is born the son of a king, but where he came from is much stranger than the king of Athens. The gull tells Thesus that his father is Poseidon. The gull serves as the guide or teacher motif that is seen in most all hero’s quests. The gull serves as an important part of the story, by giving Thesus many hints and lessons before the journey. Theseus also includes the element of the hero not being invincible. Although Theseus is strong, he is far from invincible. Theseus’s main weakness as a young boy was his self confidence. He did not believe he could defend himself against even the neighborhood boys because he was so small. The gull tells him his past and tells him that he should use size against his enemies. So when a large neighborhood boy attacks him, he defeats the boy without throwing a punch. He develops more and more confidence, but he is... Free Essays on Theseus Free Essays on Theseus Hero Quest Analysis of Theseus The ancient Greek myth, Theseus is a great example of a hero quest. It includes all thirteen elements of a hero quest clearly. It also includes certain motifs that are prime in a hero quest. This great hero quest is a story of a young boy, who is weak and poor. He finds out of his great history and attempts to find his destiny. The first element that all hero quests have is that the hero usually has a strange origin and this story is no different. As a young boy, Theseus is somewhat weak, and scared to fight. He gets beat up by the village boys a lot. One day, his mother tells him that he is really the son of a king. Confused, Thesus asks why they do not live in Athens with the king. She tells him that the king has family that wishes to divide the kingdom up among the fifty sons, and that they would have killed Theseus immediately when learning of his origin. But that is not the end of Theseus’s strange origin. One day while laying by the sea, wishing the sea would kill him, a gull visits him and tells him his true origin. He is born the son of a king, but where he came from is much stranger than the king of Athens. The gull tells Thesus that his father is Poseidon. The gull serves as the guide or teacher motif that is seen in most all hero’s quests. The gull serves as an important part of the story, by giving Thesus many hints and lessons before the journey. Theseus also includes the element of the hero not being invincible. Although Theseus is strong, he is far from invincible. Theseus’s main weakness as a young boy was his self confidence. He did not believe he could defend himself against even the neighborhood boys because he was so small. The gull tells him his past and tells him that he should use size against his enemies. So when a large neighborhood boy attacks him, he defeats the boy without throwing a punch. He develops more and more confidence, but he is...

Friday, February 21, 2020

Jordan Briefing Paper Article Example | Topics and Well Written Essays - 1500 words

Jordan Briefing Paper - Article Example In this paper, we shall discuss various aspects of the Jordan culture which will enlighten us about this country’s social, economic, religious and political scenario. Elements of Traditional Arab Culture observed in Jordan Jordan has various elements of the traditional Arab culture indebted in its roots. The bulk of the population being Muslims they believe in the religion of Islam as the other Arabs. Both the social as well as political system of this region follows the extended patriarchal family structure where the Sheikh or head of the family is chosen on the basis of their lineage, wealth and the will of their personalities. According to the system, the eldest son of the Sheikh succeeds to the throne after his father’s death. Even today in Jordan, the camel breeders are considered to be on the supreme level in the society as per the traditional Arab culture. Moreover, they follow the old Arab custom of marrying a person from within the family since anyone outside t heir clan is considered to be inferior by the traditional clans. Although the Jordanians are much more liberal in their thoughts as compared to the other Arab countries, still they are very conservative regarding women’s clothing. The traditional Arab culture where women are required to cover themselves from head to toe as well as wearing of veils is still mandatory in Jordan. In addition, the practice of the separation of sexes is virtually followed in all the places in Jordan till today (Chmidt, n.d). Extent of Influence of Westernization and Modernization on Traditional Arab Culture Lot of changes has occurred in all aspects of the Jordanian society under the influence of Westernization and Modernization. Even though the Arab culture endorses the highest level of conservatism, Jordan is far more broad-minded especially where women are concerned who enjoy considerable liberty as compared to women in other Arab countries. The female gender enjoys the freedom to complete educ ation, the right to vote, to drive cars and often hold vital positions in business and politics. In the urban areas, women enjoy greater equality and freedom than in the past, though the traditional practices still dominate their lives. Furthermore, Muslims are prohibited from drinking alcohol as per Islam however it is available in most of the restaurants and pubs in Jordan. Moreover, the growing number of educated urban youths has started believing in individualism preferring to set up their own households instead of residing with their parents. This has led to the shift in the trend from extended families to nuclear households in this country. In addition, westernization has led the Jordanian youths to alienate from their traditional cultures (The Library of Congress Country Studies, 1989a). Cultural Sensitivities of the Country As we know that Jordanians are far liberal than their neighbors but they do have certain reservations which visitors needs to keep in mind when they are touring this country. They are conservative where women’s clothing is concerned; all the local women are supposed to wear attires which cover their arms, legs and hair. Though western women and tourists are not subject to so much restriction but very revealing clothes are never apposite and conventional clothing is advisable for both men and women in Amman and outside the cities. Moreover, topless bathing is barred and one piece swimsuits are recommended although two piece swimsuits can be worn at